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classical music

category: music [glöplog]
yzi: it is what it is - usually a rather longer piece to be performed by philharmonic orchestra and to be enjoyed in a special kind of setup i.e. sitting 1-2 hours, basically not moving (almost not breathing) and just contemplating the music. And this kind of setup is demanding for the composer - you need to attract the audience by the music alone, no visuals, no strobo, no dancing, and the audience tend to be quite demanding/experienced (usually older people, but not necessarily) and analyse your music very deeply - so I guess it's a real challange and it takes usually much more time to compose a classical piece than anything else (for example they say it took Brahms 21 years to finish his 1st Symphony, still, it's not my favorite).
As for modern stuff - Strugeon's law applies, like for everything else, and as long as there are philharmonies, there will be a small, but steady demand for this kind of music. Unfortunately there is also a wave of sentimental/easy-to-listen/all-time-classical-hits concerts (ok there always have been, it's called pops! sometimes), so I don't know what's really worse.
added on the 2015-05-16 23:19:59 by tomkh tomkh
Not classical music: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kcKurvm_0oE
Western art music ("classical"): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ETNoPqYAIPI
Modern classical: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Dp3BlFZWJNA
added on the 2015-05-16 23:30:46 by noby noby
Aaand I forgot to linkify these.

Not classical music: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kcKurvm_0oE
Western art music ("classical"): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ETNoPqYAIPI
Modern classical: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Dp3BlFZWJNA
added on the 2015-05-16 23:32:16 by noby noby
noby: there was a time in modern classical music (I like to call it simply philharmonic music for the record, which I believe is more accurate) when composers wanted to break all the rules, so you could find even worse noises (still, they sound a little bit better when performed live), but even Penderecki has changed dramatically since then (check his latest stuff, I find it too "sacral" though). Some of them (i.e. Arvo Part, G. Ligeti) were strange, but even not that extreme.

Try this one, completely modern by Arturo Márquez done in 1994. If it's classical? I don't know, again, philharmonic and for "slow" listening for sure.
added on the 2015-05-16 23:52:06 by tomkh tomkh
Well isn't philharmonic music really just any music performed by a traditional orchestra? The example you posted kind of sounds exactly that; a sort of big band piece taking elements from latin music and western art music performed by an orchestra. Not classical in my book but I'm no connoisseur so I don't really know either. Classical music of course doesn't need to be orchestral at all, for an example https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NLVv-YOZQx8. As far as I understand string quartet compositions are even considered a "benchmark" in classical music.

And yeah of course there are far more abrasive examples of 20th century classical, the Penderecki piece is just what always comes first to my mind. Modern classical is a pretty tricky, the Scriabin piece I posted is considered that, as are Morton Feldman and Olivier Messiaen, pretty inconsistent label in my opinion and easily misleading. Even Glenn Branca is sometimes labeled under it. I'm ok with that, but sites like discogs go sometimes completely insane with it classifying for an example Stars Of The Lid under it. Thankfully though it's gotten better recently.
added on the 2015-05-17 00:14:49 by noby noby
noby: sure, not only orchestral, solo/quartets/all cameral stuff as well. Scriabin is definitely a classical composer. Messiaen seems to fit, but I didn't know him, thanks for the link.

The better question is: why "classical" does not include jazz? It seem to have all the traits I have mentioned before, but I suppose traditionally it must be also something with the same suspense/seriousness/maturity level - so yeah, even that Márquez is on the edge (as you have said it kind of sounds more like a big bandish stunt).

My point was - a concert setup/the way of listening is a very important part of it. And kind of the target audience (that refer themselves as classical music lovers) ultimately decides what is classical or not - and I guess their opinon about modern stuff can vary a lot.
added on the 2015-05-17 00:39:26 by tomkh tomkh
dunz0r_-_adagio_for_strings.ogg
8th place in newschool music compo at solskogen 2o17
blue max - eden
nitro - courgette
lots of stuff from generiq

all tracked

oh and the merregnon soundtrack by some elites
added on the 2017-07-17 13:16:44 by nagz nagz
I recently released something new at underground conference 8: https://files.scene.org/view/parties/2017/uc8/music_shitmusic/jco_-_john_william s_rehersal_with_professionals.mp3

I don't consider my messing around with orchestras classical music btw. I prefer the terms orchestral or symphonic. While the way I use those instruments mostly follows established stylistic conventions of european classical music culture, structurally it's way different, strongly building on pop and film music formulas to make it accessible to a broader audience. Furthermore, the formal restrictions for "actual classical music", including some of the newer genres, are hard to learn and hard to follow. Fascinating, but super niche ;)
added on the 2017-07-18 12:43:23 by jco jco
❤️❤️❤️nice pieces
added on the 2017-07-18 14:37:45 by natalia natalia
I remember a Techno version of Barber's Adagio for Strings in one demo, but I can't for the life of me remember what it was called: it featured a plain flat green ground, with a black night sky, and a whole rotating forest of trees, if I recall correctly.
added on the 2017-07-19 08:38:48 by Foebane72 Foebane72
Quote:
I have heard from classical musicians that something called the tradition of classical music is important. These modern weird ass chaotic nonsense "compositions" are regarded as classical music, because the composers and/or musicians hang around in the classical music scene. Or something. ;)


Futurama posited the idea that today's Rock'n'Roll would become tomorrow's Classical.
added on the 2017-07-19 08:40:33 by Foebane72 Foebane72
Quote:
I remember a Techno version of Barber's Adagio for Strings in one demo, but I can't for the life of me remember what it was called: it featured a plain flat green ground, with a black night sky, and a whole rotating forest of trees, if I recall correctly.


you're welcome
added on the 2017-07-19 14:01:52 by nagz nagz
can't call myself a demoscene musician, but here's an early WIP recreation of Lind Erebros piece, doing it with Renoise & Goliath:
http://soundcloud.com/rutra80/voatr
added on the 2017-07-20 23:05:22 by rutra80 rutra80
Quote:
Quote:
I remember a Techno version of Barber's Adagio for Strings in one demo, but I can't for the life of me remember what it was called: it featured a plain flat green ground, with a black night sky, and a whole rotating forest of trees, if I recall correctly.


you're welcome


That's the one! I tried searching for it the other day but got no results.
added on the 2017-07-21 11:52:23 by Foebane72 Foebane72
Quote:
Quote:
Quote:
I remember a Techno version of Barber's Adagio for Strings in one demo, but I can't for the life of me remember what it was called: it featured a plain flat green ground, with a black night sky, and a whole rotating forest of trees, if I recall correctly.


you're welcome


That's the one! I tried searching for it the other day but got no results.


strange, even google found it based on your description ;)

i think it was remixed into 4k/64k too btw
added on the 2017-07-21 16:09:49 by nagz nagz
nagz: hehe, I see you commented thefu also :)
added on the 2017-07-21 16:17:37 by pohar pohar
THEFŰ!!!!!!!! <3
added on the 2017-07-21 16:35:36 by nagz nagz
Quote:
strange, even google found it based on your description ;)


I only had one brief look for it, and I knew what it was called. Unfortunately, Pouet's search engine sucked in this case, as for some reason the title "The Fa" is run together into one word. I guess I gave up.

Besides, I sincerely doubted that Google could find prods based on a mere description, as there's so many of them with so many similar effects.
added on the 2017-07-21 19:19:02 by Foebane72 Foebane72
Jazz is not classical music because it leaves much more place to the musician's interpretation (and improvisations, etc). But as usual the border is blurry (Rhapsody in Blue comes to mind).
PulkoMandy: at the end, it's the great commission of classical music connoisseur's that have the last word.

jco:
Quote:

Furthermore, the formal restrictions for "actual classical music", including some of the newer genres, are hard to learn and hard to follow. Fascinating, but super niche ;)


Do you have any particular composers in mind?

Personally, I find very little "valuable" (to me) contemporary or even pure-classical-feel music lately. Usually it's a kind random mess, sometimes interesting; say my generation, like Nico Mulhy or other contemporaries coming from Juilliard or other fancy conservatories, but it's rarely truly enjoyable. And I'm not talking enjoyable "easy way". A piece can be complicated, but at least I want to somewhat "get it".
added on the 2017-07-23 15:58:13 by tomkh tomkh
tomkh: If you're looking for something "easy on the ears", I find Mike Oldfields "Music of the Spheres" very enjoyable. Philip Glass is worth checking out too, if you're into this kind of thing (minimalism). Maybe watch Koyaanisqatsi if you don't know it yet :)
Jóhann Jóhannsson might be worth checking out, even though he does film scores primarily (He's got an orchestral album called "IBM 1401, A User's Manual"!). Let's hope he doesn't fuck up the upcoming Blade Runner, the Trailer gave me the creeps.

I don't know much about particular contemporary "serious" composers, I bet it's still mostly experimental, artsy stuff that one has to understand on an academic level in order to get any enjoyment out of it.

Random offtopic Jazz tips: Hiromi - Alive, Avishai Cohen Trio & Ensemble - At Home
added on the 2017-07-24 14:29:24 by jco jco
John Barry.

nuff said. he made film scores about 50 years ago, BEST use of symphonics.

not "classical" in its rigid sense but draws a huge amount of inspiration from the greats.

besides, if classical music greats were alive today they would all play progressive metal :)
added on the 2017-07-24 17:19:29 by nagz nagz
jco: Mike Oldfield is a bit too easy - he just has tendency for going into full-on sentimental, which just makes me cringe. For Glass, I enjoy his piano etudes, the rest, unfortunately not so much.
Jóhann Jóhannsson is interesting indeed. I can hear microtonality and some more contemporary influences. That's a bit closer to "me gusta" ;) Of course, as a typical cinematic score it is a bit too much program driven and mood/drama oriented, but it's surely satisfying to listen.
Thanks for the hints, anyway. Some of those I didn't try yet.

Quote:

I don't know much about particular contemporary "serious" composers, I bet it's still mostly experimental, artsy stuff that one has to understand on an academic level in order to get any enjoyment out of it.


That's a part of my on-going wikipedia/youtube research. I do know few concepts, like sonorism, aleatoricism, already mentioned microtonalism, bitonalism or polytonalism in general, etc... But am I familiar with those concepts fully? I guess not, as it is still hard for me to easily recognize "by ear" what is what.
added on the 2017-07-24 21:36:56 by tomkh tomkh
youtube has a long list of satirical "fugue" variants of modern pop music.

"fur elise" was just too great for the c64 and amiga hardware, being a long harmonic lullaby sequence, just right for its fm synth.
added on the 2017-09-04 12:13:52 by ollj ollj

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