pouët.net

I hate ascii art!

category: general [glöplog]
Looks nothing like me dildo! I look more like George Clooney.

I remember in a world of ascii and it was cool! landscapes and everything.
i like most nfo files that have ascii art in it.
i don't hate it. i think it just makes them more fun to read.

if you dont like ascii art i suggest you get an 'ascii-art filter' of some sort.. *poff*
added on the 2003-07-07 22:17:56 by rydi rydi
How can u not like ascii... ascii is like sex. everybody likes it. if you don't you are different and strange and nobody will play with you and you are never gonna have a girlfriend and you are going to get tons of spam! Now forward this to everyone on your contact list, or you'll get sonic diarhea.
added on the 2003-07-07 22:48:49 by moT moT
Quote:
ascii is like sex. everybody likes it.


yeah, apart from people allergic to most semen-'safe' solvents -and believe me, there are many.

How would *you* like to have your member balloon up to over +half it's normal size just because someone was inconsiderate enough not to check if you're 'sensitive' to the chemicals used?

trust me, icecubes are NOT potent enough.
added on the 2003-07-08 03:44:27 by Shifter Shifter
Being allergic to the spermicide on a condom is a reason to not like sex??? Why not just get non-spermicide, non-lubricated types and enjoya vigorous shag???

It's like saying you don't like ascii art cause .nfo makes your eyes itch.
added on the 2003-07-08 10:17:02 by psonice psonice
i dont like sex because it doesnt involve any ascii
added on the 2003-07-08 15:49:59 by lithis lithis
Obviously, you've never heard of http://www.asciipr0n.com ;)
added on the 2003-07-08 15:52:28 by tomaes tomaes
Is it me or is the guy on the front page suffering from a condom-related allergy?
added on the 2003-07-08 17:01:17 by psonice psonice
asciip0n.com ownz! ;)
added on the 2003-07-08 17:29:55 by ravepants ravepants
I do like ASCII art, but mostly the "unscenish" kind (the kind of thing Pigpen posted). Most scene ascii art seems to be ugly logos, not exactly creative.

Also, another argument against it is that people use Wordpad to view a lot of text files. And ASCII viewed in Wordpad with the default font is a disaster.
added on the 2003-07-08 23:34:35 by vhiiula vhiiula
To really love, appreciate and understand (oldschool) ASCII art is somewhat analogous to urban graffiti writing...

As much as I hate to admit it, there was once a time where I just didn't get ami styled ASCII art. You need to re-learn how you see things just like many people have to get in the trenches so to speak to be able to comprehend the beauty of graffiti art. There is no easy way to explain this I think.

And there are so many other schools of "sceneish" (as someone else put it) ASCII art -- block style (uncolored PC-ANSI style basically), newschool style, etc which are generally more appealing to the ASCII newb.

If you don't like it, and you're stuck in your ways, I can't help you there. But if you want to learn more and expand your horizons a bit on what is out there, I strongly recommend visiting www.thuglife.org and checking out some of the more recent artpacks and collections of work.

-r
added on the 2003-07-09 08:43:17 by RaD Man RaD Man
Whats the best font for viewing ascii in nowadays?
added on the 2003-07-09 10:34:09 by psonice psonice
trying to be any more pathetic, than i am now, let's write some things about demos in parallel:

1. You can hardly ever read what the logos say.
- a good oldskool demo contains some scrollers you can never ever read. not that you really want to. (just like those logos)

2. When you want to read an info file you have to scroll through loads of ascii art and symbols just to find two lines of intructions or something.
- Take Crystal Dreams2: If you wish to read the info, you have to watch the whole demo... what a time-wasting :)

3. When you fill voteforms the whole ascii form screws up as soon as you start to type and its a right pain in the ass.
- well.... let's skip this one...

4. If you look at it on a less that fullscreen window it's messed up anyway.
- demos suck windowed too big time. maybe not messed up, but ugly...

5. It doesn't even look pretty. At least with gfx logos or design it's a bit of eye candy and makes things look better but ascii doesnt do that.
- majority of the demos doesn't look pretty either. Maybe, a color galore, or an fx overload, but nothing we could call pretty.

6. on a bbs it just makes it a nightmare trying to browse files for something intersting.
- browsing a BBS is still a nightmare without funny ASCIIz :)

anyways, i am more of a coder than an ascii artist :)
added on the 2003-07-09 15:32:43 by FooLman FooLman
FooLman: about crystal dream 2: afaik there's a command line option which will let you start from different parts of the demo, including jumping directly to the end ;)
added on the 2003-07-09 16:09:52 by fox fox
Quote:
Whats the best font for viewing ascii in nowadays?


Generally speaking, the best font to view ASCII art in is the same character set the artist used to create it. With experience, you eventually just know which font goes best with which ASCII. Sometimes an artist will suggest "View with AMI.COM" or "View in 80x50". But since ASCII art can be created on virtually any kind of computer, there are specific TSRs, emulators and viewers created to allow viewers to see the artwork as it was originally intended to be seen.

We (ACiD) released our first Windows-based artscene image viewer this week, entitled ACiD View 6. It has several character sets built in, such as standard IBM PC DOS 80x25 & 80x50 aspect ratio/line mode fonts, a perfect Amiga Topaz font, and a capture of an older font we used to use in ACiD View 4.xx for ANSI viewing.

ACiD View 6 is available at:
http://www.acid.org/ftp/avw-600.zip

-r
added on the 2003-07-09 17:48:39 by RaD Man RaD Man
btw does someone have any ideas on what to use to make ascii into png/gif/whatever.. I tried some programs but they all sucked or didn't support 80x50 or didn't compile etc etc... don't say "push printscreen button under windows" please...
added on the 2003-07-10 02:58:04 by violator violator
RaD Man: Character set doesn't matter, since _ASCII art _ always uses the same character set.

Depending on the image, Topaz, Fixedsys or Lucida Console may be the best chocie in the Windows world.
added on the 2003-07-10 14:09:38 by DiamonDie DiamonDie
well, radman got the right point there, because there's a difference between ascii that's done on the amiga and pc-enigineered ascii or moreover, the specific typesets.

maybe an ascii artist might want to comment on that, as i'm basically just consuming ascii-art.
added on the 2003-07-10 17:04:15 by dalezr dalezr
Quote:

RaD Man: Character set doesn't matter, since _ASCII art _ always uses the same character set.

Depending on the image, Topaz, Fixedsys or Lucida Console may be the best chocie in the Windows world.


This couldn't be further from the truth and is at the very least misleading. Even during the hay-day of DOS, the ROM containing the IBM PC character set differed ever so slightly from manufacturer to manufacturer.

I'll use the zero character as an example. I have 2 IBM-PC compatible computers both manufacturered in 1994. One has a zero which looks like an O with a slash through it, the other has a much rounder looking O but it has a dot in the middle so as not to confuse it with the letter O.

Another excellent example of differences in character set is the forward and backslash. On IBM PCs, especially after VGA cards became the norm, they were spaced apart and disconnected. On an Amiga PC they appear to connect, which is why the "oldschool" style of Amiga ASCII looks so much better on it's native platform.

What I believe you were trying to say is that if an artist doesn't go beyond the original 128 ASCII characters, they will all appear the same across all platforms. And that if you use extended characters such as IBM PC "Extended Characters" or "High ASCII" then things will be fucked on another computer. But it's much more complex than that, even the base 128 true ASCII characters aren't exact pixel-by-pixel matches from one computer to another, sometimes even in the same computer family.

End of lesson, class dismissed.

-r
added on the 2003-07-10 17:25:24 by RaD Man RaD Man
I still think we need a line in the file somewhere saying what font should be used.
added on the 2003-07-10 17:43:19 by psonice psonice

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